Seller
Your price
£4.96
RRP: £7.99
Save £3.03 (38%)
Dispatched within 3-4 working days.

Combinatorics: A Very Short Introduction

Very Short Introductions

By (author) Robin Wilson
Format: Paperback / softback
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom
Published: 28th Apr 2016
Dimensions: w 114mm h 174mm d 9mm
Weight: 158g
ISBN-10: 0198723490
ISBN-13: 9780198723493
Barcode No: 9780198723493
Synopsis
How many possible sudoku puzzles are there? In the lottery, what is the chance that two winning balls have consecutive numbers? Who invented Pascal's triangle? (it was not Pascal) Combinatorics, the branch of mathematics concerned with selecting, arranging, and listing or counting collections of objects, works to answer all these questions. Dating back some 3000 years, and initially consisting mainly of the study of permutations and combinations, its scope has broadened to include topics such as graph theory, partitions of numbers, block designs, design of codes, and latin squares. In this Very Short Introduction Robin Wilson gives an overview of the field and its applications in mathematics and computer theory, considering problems from the shortest routes covering certain stops to the minimum number of colours needed to colour a map with different colours for neighbouring countries. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

New & Used

Seller Information Condition Price
-New£4.96
+ FREE UK P & P

What Reviewers Are Saying

Submit your review
Newspapers & Magazines
Clear and beautifully written ... this book is much more than a simple introduction ... [Its] great strength is that while examining a number of important concepts in detail, the author does so ... without using complicated abstract formulae. * Mathematics Today *