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The Silmarillion

By (author) J. R. R. Tolkien
Volume editor Christopher Tolkien
Illustrated by Ted Nasmith
Genres: Fantasy
Format: Paperback
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers, London, United Kingdom
Imprint: HarperCollins Publishers Ltd
Published: 2nd Oct 2000
Dimensions: w 165mm h 246mm
Weight: 870g
ISBN-10: 0261103679
ISBN-13: 9780261103672
Barcode No: 9780261103672
Synopsis
A trade paperback edition of the celebrated illustrated Silmarillion. J R R Tolkien's SILMARILLION is the core work of the Middle-earth canon. It is in this dense and often neglected masterpiece that the entire cosmology for the background for THE HOBBIT and, particularly, THE LORD OF THE RINGS is documented. The volume contains fabulous tales of heroes and monsters, and the history of the Elves and of the Silmarils -- the magical jewels produced by the Children of Iluvatar, or Elves (humans being the Younger Children of Iluvatar); it tells of the creation of Middle-earth, and the coming of Men into the world; and it chronicles the early battles between good and evil, forces of light and dark, which foreshadow the great conflict with Sauron, the Dark Lord, in LORD OF THE RINGS. 2000 marks a new beginning for these tales of the First Age of Middle-earth, published posthumously in 1977. Tolkien worked on THE SILMARILLION all his life -- long before THE HOBBIT or LORD OF THE RINGS -- and his son and literary executor, Christopher Tolkien, edited the material he left behind into its current form. Now, at the start of a new millennium, THE SILMARILLION is presented afresh with 20 sumptuous illustrations by Ted Nasmith, perhaps the finest of Tolkien artists.

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Newspapers & Magazines
'How, given little over half a century of work, did one man become the creative equivalent of a people?' The Guardian 'Demanding to be compared with English mythologies... at times rises to the greatness of true myth' Financial Times 'A creation of singular beauty... magnificent in its best moments' Washington Post 'A grim, tragic, brooding and beautiful book, shot through with heroism and hope... its power is almost that of mysticism' Toronto Globe & Mail
Kirkus US
The total volume of Tolkien's Middle-Earth manuscripts is vastly greater than that of the completed Lord of the Rings, but it seems to be a near-hopeless tangle of variants and unfinished reworkings in both prose and verse. From the great body of material dealing with the "First Age" of Middle-Earth, Tolkien's son Christopher has compiled a prose narrative of the events surrounding the making and eventual loss of the three jewels called the Silmarils, many centuries before the Wars of the Ring. The protagonists are chiefly Elves. They appear here not as the steadfast, transcendent figures of the Ring books, but in their youth as a fiery and much-divided race capable of uglier passions than any of the "good" characters in the trilogy. The telling is uniformly solemn and distanced, compressing a great range of events into a schematic summation that is a far cry from the varied, immediate narrative of the Ring story. Taking a negative view, one might say that this is not a book or even a fragment of one; it is a grandiose outline showing the Tolkien style at its most determinedly pseudo-biblical. But the alternative view is more to the point: even these truncated materials shed an astonishing amount of "historical" light on The Lord of the Rings. The Silmarillion proper is the largest single chunk of "history," but it is accompanied by four shorter chronicles which first establish the foundations of Middle-Earth (an explicit Creation-myth) and then convey the great sweep of history from the Silmaril wars to the Wars of the Ring. Turning back to the trilogy from this new prologue, one finds the intrinsic grandeur of Tolkien's design re-illuminated at every stage. It is now sadly clear that we shall have no more Middle-Earth books - that is, books in their own right. But thanks to the efforts of Christopher Tolkien, we may be privileged in coming years to follow a progressive and dazzling enrichment of the book we all thought we knew. (Kirkus Reviews)