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Lorenz

Breaking Hitler's Top Secret Code at Bletchley Park

By (author) Jerry Roberts
Format: Hardback
Publisher: The History Press Ltd, Stroud, United Kingdom
Published: 1st Mar 2017
Dimensions: w 154mm h 240mm d 27mm
Weight: 565g
ISBN-10: 0750978856
ISBN-13: 9780750978859
Barcode No: 9780750978859
Synopsis
The breaking of the Enigma machine is one of the most heroic stories of the Second World War and highlights the crucial work of the codebreakers of Bletchley Park, which prevented Britain's certain defeat in 1941. But there was another German cipher machine, used by Hitler himself to convey messages to his top generals in the field. A machine more complex and secure than Enigma. A machine that could never be broken. For sixty years, no one knew about Lorenz or `Tunny', or the determined group of men who finally broke the code and thus changed the course of the war. Many of them went to their deaths without anyone knowing of their achievements. Here, for the first time, senior codebreaker Captain Jerry Roberts tells the complete story of this extraordinary feat of intellect and of his struggle to get his wartime colleagues the recognition they deserve. The work carried out at Bletchley Park during the war to partially automate the process of breaking Lorenz, which had previously been done entirely by hand, was groundbreaking and is recognised as having kick-started the modern computer age.

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May 14th 2017, 13:56
Great insight into an underrepresented moment in history.
Excellent - 9 out of 10
Captain Jerry Roberts writes of his time involved with the crew breaking the Lorenz encoded transmissions during WWII. These communications were vital because they were coming from Germany's high command, including from Hitler himself. Bill Tutte was able to break this complex system of code without even seeing the machine that created it, and the crew tirelessly used their skills for the betterment of the world. Once declassified, Jerry made it his life's final mission to spread the word about the amazing accomplishments of the Testery at Bletchley Park. I found this to be a fascinating and insightful telling by the last survivor of the original group of code breakers. This story could have been lost to history, and I'm glad it wasn't. The only reason why I did not give this book a 10 out of 10 was because he could get a bit repetitive at times. It's understandable when having a mission to complete at the twilight of your life, but it did make parts drag slightly. It's reminiscent of a grandfather telling his stories to you, and it reveals so much of an era that's fading from memory. I'd highly recommend reading this book and passing it on to others to ensure it's not forgotten. I know that's what I'll be doing.
May 14th 2017, 13:55
Great insight into an underrepresented moment in history.
Excellent - 9 out of 10
Captain Jerry Roberts writes of his time involved with the crew breaking the Lorenz encoded transmissions during WWII. These communications were vital because they were coming from Germany's high command, including from Hitler himself. Bill Tutte was able to break this complex system of code without even seeing the machine that created it, and the crew tirelessly used their skills for the betterment of the world. Once declassified, Jerry made it his life's final mission to spread the word about the amazing accomplishments of the Testery at Bletchley Park. I found this to be a fascinating and insightful telling by the last survivor of the original group of code breakers. This story could have been lost to history, and I'm glad it wasn't. The only reason why I did not give this book a 10 out of 10 was because he could get a bit repetitive at times. It's understandable when having a mission to complete at the twilight of your life, but it did make parts drag slightly. It's reminiscent of a grandfather telling his stories to you, and it reveals so much of an era that's fading from memory. I'd highly recommend reading this book and passing it on to others to ensure it's not forgotten. I know that's what I'll be doing.
Newspapers & Magazines
For sixty years no one knew what Lorenz or 'Tunny' was, or who the men were who broke the code and changed the course of war. Captain Jerry Roberts, a humble man and senior codebreaker at Bletchley during WWII, awarded the MBE in 2013, and his team deciphered Hitler's most secret messages, providing vital information for the operations both before and after D-Day. Their achievement was groundbreaking, unimaginable. Everyone made their contribution, whether big or small, in the breaking of Lorenz, and England counted itself lucky to have such brilliant people in the right place at the right time. Many went to their death not knowing what part they played in winning the war. Lorenz is part of British history and a fascinating read. -- Kerin Freeman, author of 'The Civilian Bomb Disposing Earl'