Seller
Your price
£25.00
Out of Stock

John Minton

Dance Till the Stars Come Down

By (author) Frances Spalding
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Lund Humphries Publishers Ltd, London, United Kingdom
Published: 28th May 2005
Dimensions: w 156mm h 241mm d 32mm
Weight: 850g
ISBN-10: 0853319189
ISBN-13: 9780853319184
Barcode No: 9780853319184
Synopsis
John Minton (1917-57) was an artist, a Bohemian and, in his own lifetime, a myth. During the 1940s and early 1950s he become a central figure within Soho, an intimate friend of, among many others, Michael Ayrton, Robert Colquhoun, Lucian Freud and the poet W.S. Graham. He enjoyed early success as a painter and was associated in the 1940s with the English Neo-Romantics. By the early 1950s he had become the most admired and influential illustrator of his day. Frances Spalding's sensitive account of Minton's life and work makes use of letters, articles and revue sketches by Minton himself, as well as many interviews with the artist's friends and acquaintances. She brings out the many conflicts within him, and shows how these were reflected in his art through its combination of romantic imagery and taut severities of style. His deep melancholy was for the most part kept hidden behind a euphoric generosity and a wild restlessness. But gradually, like his alcoholism, it became all-pervasive, and tragic and embittered he took his own life, aged thirty-nine. This new edition incorporates a new preface by the author and a new appendix featuring lists of public collections, exhibitions, illustrated books and book jackets, and a select bibliography. It will be widely welcomed by art historians, curators, dealers and all those interested in this fascinating period in British art and culture.

New & Used

Seller Information Condition Price
-New
Out of Stock

What Reviewers Are Saying

Submit your review
Newspapers & Magazines
'... deeply attractive biography. A sensitive book to my mind and as interesting to the student of art as it is to the lay reader and the art historian and a book not to be missed.' Richard Edmunds, Birmingham Post 15/04/06