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Television Series of the 1960s

Essential Facts and Quirky Details

By (author) Vincent Terrace
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD, United States
Imprint: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Published: 30th Aug 2016
Dimensions: w 158mm h 237mm d 23mm
Weight: 513g
ISBN-10: 1442268344
ISBN-13: 9781442268340
Barcode No: 9781442268340
Synopsis
By 1960, watching television had become the pastime of millions of viewers around the world. Week after week, audiences tuned in to watch their favorite programs and catch up with their favorite characters. During the 1960s, some of the most beloved shows of all time originally aired, including The Andy Griffith Show, The Fugitive, Get Smart, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., and The Wild, Wild West. Even after these shows departed the airwaves, they lived on in syndication, entertaining several generations of viewers. Devoted and casual fans alike can probably remember basic facts about these shows-like the name of Rob Petrie's boss on The Dick Van Dyke Show or the original captain of the USS Enterprise-but more obscure facts, like Barney Fife's middle name, might be harder to recall. In Television Series of the 1960s: Essential Facts and Quirky Details, Vincent Terrace presents readers with a cornucopia of information about more than seventy-five programs from the decade. For example, did you know that on The Addams Family, Lurch's mother wanted him to become a jockey? Or that on The Avengers, John Steed had a pet dog named Freckles? Or that Patty and Cathy Lane of The Patty Duke Show had a distant cousin named Betsy Lane? These are but a few of the hundreds of fun and intriguing specifics contained within this volume. Shows from all three major networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC)-as well as select syndicated programs-are represented here. This is not a book of opinions or essays about specific television programs but a treasure trove of the facts associated with each of these programs. From Mister Ed's social security number to the zip code for Hooterville on Green Acres, readers will discover a wealth of fascinating information that, for the most part, cannot be found anywhere else. In some cases, the factual data detailed herein is the only such documentation that exists. Television Series of the 1960s is the ideal reference for fans of this decade and anyone looking to stump even the most knowledgeable trivia expert.

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Television historian Terrace offers readers a fun and informative look into the world of classic TV. The basic facts of year and cast and a one-line plot description are included for 75 shows from the 1950s, and 100 shows from the 1960s. An incredibly detailed listing on each of the main characters follows (for example, Bewitched's Samantha Stevens gets a full profile, including eye color, addresses, favorite eateries, and a list of her relatives), but the meat of each entry is the entertaining narrative Terrace provides. It's obvious he knows (and loves) these shows inside and out, and readers will have a good time learning wacky facts about The Brady Bunch (Greg and Peter were the only kids to not wear braces on the show); Lost in Space (Penny Robinson had an IQ of 147); Father Knows Best (Jim Anderson's specialty is annuities); and The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis (Maynard G. Krebs was turned down 46 times for his driver's license). [This volume] should have broad appeal; give [it] to diehard fans of the show as well as those with a general interest in the eras or in television trivia in general. * Booklist * Over the past 40 years, Terrace has to his credit more than three dozen reference books on television and radio history, including such works as the Encyclopedia of Television Shows, 1925 through 2007 and Internet Drama and Mystery Television Series, 1996-2014. This volume continues his decade-by-decade exploration of `quirky details' covering more than 80 network television series of the 1960s. Terrace notes that he excluded shows that lacked sufficient data, and his typical entry includes the network, years in production, cast members, and the show's `basis' or brief summary of the premise. The bulk of entries include a character-by-character listing of details calculated to delight TV buffs. For example, an entry on Rob Petrie of The Dick Van Dyke Show offers readers details of the fictional character's backstory, shoe size, allergies, and cemetery plot location. Such treatment might continue with notes on origins and updates, including further productions within the franchise. Occasionally, even more details are provided under the heading `Overall Series Information.' There are black-and-white (and a few color) publicity stills scattered through the book. The target audience for this volume is trivia buffs and nostalgic fans, so this is a solid purchase for public libraries serving that demographic.

Summing Up: Recommended. General readers. * CHOICE * Sprinkled throughout [the] book are archival photos, airdates and so much nostalgic goodies that even the most diehard of TV fans will be thrilled and excited turning each and every page. * Boyce McClain's Collectors' Corner *