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American Literature and Irish Culture, 1910-55

The Politics of Enchantment

By (author) Tara Stubbs
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Manchester University Press, Manchester, United Kingdom
Published: 10th Mar 2017
Dimensions: w 138mm h 213mm d 17mm
Weight: 345g
ISBN-10: 1526116766
ISBN-13: 9781526116765
Barcode No: 9781526116765
Synopsis
This book discusses how and why American modernist writers turned to Ireland at various stages during their careers. By placing events such as the Celtic Revival and the Easter Rising at the centre of the discussion, it shows how Irishness became a cultural determinant in the work of American modernists. It is the first study to extend the analysis of Irish influence on American literature beyond racial, ethnic or national frameworks. Through close readings and archival research, American literature and Irish culture, 1910-55 provides a balanced and structured approach to the study of the complexities of American modernist writers' responses to Ireland. Offering new readings of familiar literary figures - including Fitzgerald, Moore, O'Neill, Steinbeck and Stevens - it makes for essential reading for students and academics working on twentieth-century American and Irish literature and culture, and transatlantic studies. -- .

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'Stubbs helps us to "see the lightning" in her brilliant analyses of some truly remarkable works of poetry and fiction written by US authors in the first half of the twentieth century. At the same time, she allows us to understand its source in new ways and to hear inflections of voice that owe much to an enchantment with Ireland - that "Celtic parcel of irresistible allure" - that still needs unpacking.'
Philip Coleman, the Dublin Review of Books, November 2014.

'The book is a valuable intervention not just into the fields of American and Irish literature, but also into the study of transnational cultural encounters and, more philosophically, the responsibilities (and legitimate irresponsibilities) of the imagination.'
Alex Runchman , Comparative American Studies, December 2015

'The sharp writing, detailed analysis, and inclusion of archival research make this a strong resource for those interested in Irish-American studies and help foreground the usefulness of a transatlantic perspective when considering both Irish and American literary histories.'
Christopher Dowd, Irish Studies Review, July 2014 -- .