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Sorting Out Behaviour

A Head Teacher's Guide

By (author) Jeremy Rowe
Edited by Ian Gilbert
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Independent Thinking Press, Carmarthen, United Kingdom
Published: 4th Jun 2013
Dimensions: w 123mm h 172mm d 12mm
Weight: 195g
ISBN-10: 1781350116
ISBN-13: 9781781350119
Barcode No: 9781781350119
Synopsis
Inspirational, simple, profound and clear this guide provides no-nonsense advice providing teachers with the confidence to implement transformational, successful behavioural management structures within the school environment. Drawing on years of experience, the author shares the most effective methods of classroom management - avoiding disruption - enabling teachers to ensure that pupils receive the best education, with minimal distraction. He provides a stress-free, step-by-step guide for teachers, parents and educational leaders in creating a positive approach to challenging behaviour in groups and individuals.

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I strongly recommend this extremely useful and practical guide, which demonstrates that effective behaviour management is about clarity, transparency, consistency and a set of manageable policies and procedures which are kept under constant review. Drawing on the author's vast, first-hand experience, it is a source of common sense and practical pointers which wouldenable all school staff from trainees to experienced school leaders to review their behaviour policies, practices and procedures.Brian Lightman, General Secretary, Association of School and College LeadersThank you to Jeremy Rowe for providing a plain English, common sense, easy to read guide about behaviour. Perhaps more importantly, he reminds us that children aren't criminals and that most schools are calm, productive, orderly places that are far removed from the image so often portrayed in the media. Weneed to hear that message more often.Fiona Millar, Guardian Columnist