Seller
Your price
£27.24
RRP: £45.00
Save £17.76 (39%)
Dispatched within 3-5 working days.

Bryan Wynter

By (author) Michael Bird
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Lund Humphries Publishers Ltd, London, United Kingdom
Published: 28th Apr 2010
Dimensions: w 239mm h 299mm d 35mm
Weight: 1545g
ISBN-10: 184822009X
ISBN-13: 9781848220096
Barcode No: 9781848220096
Synopsis
Bryan Wynter (1915-75) was a major figure in post-war British art. This is the first full-length survey of his career. It examines the cultural, intellectual and social contexts of his work, from his early studies at the Slade and interest in Surrealism, through his move to Cornwall after the Second World War and his place in the progressive art scene in London and St Ives between 1945 and 1975. Michael Bird establishes the theme of Wynter as a 'great experimenter' - a facet of his personality that is reflected in his art throughout his career. It incorporates Wynter's application of Surrealist methods, his passion for exploring his surroundings on land and water, the connection between Wynter's use of the drug mescaline and his great series of abstract paintings from 1956-61, and his groundbreaking experiments in kinetic art in the 1960s. Wynter has often been seen as a 'St Ives' artist. This book examines key differences between Wynter and his close associate Patrick Heron. It places both Wynter's art and his thinking firmly in the wider context of the post-war British and American avant-garde. Generously illustrated with works from all periods of Wynter's creative life, including many works never previously reproduced, this book makes an important contribution to the history of post-war British art. It will be a valuable source of reference for all those with an interest in abstract art, the St Ives painters, and post-war cultural history.

New & Used

Seller Information Condition Price
-New£27.24
+ FREE UK P & P

What Reviewers Are Saying

Submit your review
Newspapers & Magazines
'Michael Bird's book on the post-War artist Bryan Wynter is a highly readable account of an artist about whom little has been published.' The Burlington Magazine