Seller
Your price
£64.49
RRP: £90.00
Save £25.51 (28%)
Dispatched within 3-4 working days.

Political Economy of the Black Sea

Dynamics of Conflict and Co-operation. Library of International Relations v. 16

Edited by Tunc Aybak
Format: Hardback
Publisher: I.B.Tauris & Co. Ltd., London, United Kingdom
Imprint: I.B.Tauris
Published: 12th Jan 2001
Dimensions: w 140mm h 224mm d 25mm
Weight: 471g
ISBN-10: 1860644546
ISBN-13: 9781860644542
Barcode No: 9781860644542
Synopsis
The post-Cold War period has seen the emergence of the Black Sea as a region of key strategic importance. As a conduit point for energy pipelines, the sea and its surrounding states are inextricably linked with the exploitation of energy resources in the Caspian Sea and beyond. The heightened risk of ethnic conflict, territorial disputes and instability has been matched by opportunities for regional co-operation on pressing economic and ecological matters. In 1992 the Black Sea Economic Co-operation Project (BSCP) was instigated by Turkey to further interregional agreements on issues such as environmental pollution, and the exploitation and transportation of oil and energy resources in the region. The BSCP consists of the member states of Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Moldova, Romania, Turkey, and Ukraine. Simultaneously with this development, international companies have begun to move into the area, seeking access to the Caucasus, the Caspian Sea and the Central Asian republics. What are the prospects for the Black Sea? This text assesses the dynamics of interregional relations, and attempts to weigh up the risks and opportunities of the post-Cold War era.

New & Used

Seller Information Condition Price
-New£64.49
+ FREE UK P & P

What Reviewers Are Saying

Submit your review
Newspapers & Magazines
This very welcome volume provides much needed material on an area that has gained significantly in importance... Slavic Review This very welcome volume provides much needed material on an area that has gained significantly in importance... Slavic Review