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9226 Kercheval

The Storefront That Did Not Burn. Ann Arbor Paperbacks

By (author) Nancy Milio
Format: Paperback
Publisher: The University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, United States
Published: 28th Feb 1970
Dimensions: w 140mm h 220mm d 14mm
Weight: 227g
ISBN-10: 0472061801
ISBN-13: 9780472061808
Barcode No: 9780472061808
Synopsis
The story of the Mom and Tots Center, a storefront health center in the Detroit ghetto.

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Kirkus US
9226 Kercheval is the storefront address for the Mom and Tots Neighborhood Center, initiated by the author four years ago as a new concept in community health care. When the Detroit Riots of 1967 literally razed the low-income area of Kercheval and McClellan Streets, this storefront remained untouched. The reasons are not hard to find in this first-hand account of the day-care center that proved to be a viable matrix for community social action. Originally born near Kercheval Street, Miss Milio returned there in 1963 as a ghetto worker from the Visiting Nurses Association. Three years later she opened the Mom and Tots Neighborhood Center, an organization which expanded its work to encompass nearly every critical need of the ghetto inhabitant - acute shortages of cash, transportation and babysitting problems, erratic work hours, pre- and post-natal care, birth control information, medical treatment, political and social organization, nutritional diet. The password for the center was "talking, listening, playing, loving" and over difficult periods of adjustment the motto fulfilled its goal. Miss Milio's participant-observer study is an exceptionally readable record of the group she directed. It combines her own prose-poetry comments with questionnaire analyses, menus, schedules, staff dialogues and diary excerpts. Not least interesting to the reader concerned with urban problems is Miss Milio's transcendence of her authoritarian "whitey" symbol and the reward of equal trust and self-worth that is her definition of health. (Kirkus Reviews)