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Economic Reform in Japan

Can the Japanese Change?

Edited by Craig Freedman
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd, Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Published: 26th Sep 2001
Dimensions: w 234mm h 156mm d 20mm
Weight: 527g
ISBN-10: 1840645091
ISBN-13: 9781840645095
Barcode No: 9781840645095
Synopsis
At the start of a new century, Japan finds itself confronted with an economic challenge that is unlike any it has faced since the end of World War II. Most commentators agree that Japan has to change. The issue is the form and direction that such a change must take. While many Western economists forcefully urge the Japanese to become more like the US, there are other academics who have registered strong reservations to such a simplistic solution. In this volume, noted scholars take opposing positions on key issues including financial reform, corporate change and international trade. The editor contributes a thought-provoking introduction which also presents an overview of the topic. The papers gathered here present an opportunity for readers to consider the underlying conflicts in Japan's economy and society that makes choosing a new direction such a difficult proposition. Economic Reform in Japan is a coherent and eminently readable book designed to provoke further discussion amongst scholars and researchers of Japan and East Asia, economists, political scientists and sociologists.

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'These lively, thoughtful and provocative essays by Ron Dore and other substantial scholars provide important insights, while reflecting quite divergent views as to how Japan should reform its economic institutions. While change in Japan is inevitable, desirable and indeed occurring, there is no consensus on the outcomes, or whether Japan will converge to the Anglo-American model. These and related themes makes this a stimulating read.' -- Hugh T. Patrick, Columbia University, US