Seller
Your price
£268.00
RRP: £380.00
Save £112.00 (29%)
Dispatched within 3-4 working days.

Economics of Federalism

Economic Approaches to Law Series v. 7

Format: Hardback
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd, Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Published: 26th Jul 2007
Dimensions: w 244mm h 169mm d 20mm
Weight: 2592g
ISBN-10: 1845425278
ISBN-13: 9781845425272
Barcode No: 9781845425272
Synopsis
This insightful and authoritative two-volume set examines the major issues and theories concerning federal political systems. The book covers the two main branches in the economics literature. The first branch, on competitive federalism focuses on the horizontal structure of federalism, as well as examining the jurisdictional competition between state and governments for mobile individuals and resources. The second branch focuses on fiscal federalism and examines the vertical structure of federalism, or the division of public services and taxing power between central and state governments. This comprehensive set also examines applications of the economic analysis of federalism in specific areas of the law, including: corporate law; antitrust law; environmental law; choice of law rules; contractual choice of law and public choice theory. It will be of interest to economic and legal scholars alike.

New & Used

Seller Information Condition Price
-New£268.00
+ FREE UK P & P

What Reviewers Are Saying

Submit your review
Newspapers & Magazines
'A terrific collection of canonical federalism articles, along with a characteristically clear-headed Introduction by the editors. The volume will be very helpful to legal scholars, economists, and political scientists who teach courses on the increasingly dominant economic theories of federalism.' -- Michael S. Greve, American Enterprise Institute, US 'The two Kobayashi-Ribstein volumes on economics of federalism contain a nicely structured collection of key papers that provide both needed background and illuminating applications of economic analysis to the basic legal issues that arise in a setting of multi-level government.' -- Wallace E. Oates, University of Maryland, College Park, US