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Embracing Nondirectivity

Reassessing Person-centred Theory and Practice in the 21st Century

Edited by Brian E. Levitt
Genres: Psychotherapy
Format: Paperback
Publisher: PCCS Books, Manchester, United Kingdom
Published: 26th Jul 2005
Dimensions: w 152mm h 234mm d 23mm
Weight: 567g
ISBN-10: 1898059683
ISBN-13: 9781898059684
Barcode No: 9781898059684
Synopsis
Non-directivity is the distinguishing feature of the revolutionary, anti-authoritarian approach to psychotherapy and human relations developed by Carl Rogers. The book brings together an impressive international collection of person-centered writers, each exploring an important facet of non-directivity as it relates to person-centered theory and practice. Their contributions examine the history, theory, applications, and implications of the non-directive attitude. Non-directivity emerges in these pages as a way of being that remains vital and highly relevant to the practice of person-centered therapy, other person-centered applications, and psychotherapy in general.

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Many of the 'believers' in non-directivity can be found in 'Embracing Non-Directivity' edited by Brian. E. Levitt (2005) (the roll call is an excellent reminder that it is not passe nor academically unsound to be non-directive) and the behavioural/attitudinal distinction runs through many of their articles, explicitly or otherwise. In fact, to drive it home from the outset, the introductory chapter is a revised version of Barbara Temaner Brodley's classic short paper from 1999, 'About the Non-directive Attitude', which articulates the issue simply and skillfully and is a great opener - From hereonin the book is almost an embarrassment of riches. It is a scholarly collection and one that lends formidable weight to the argument that rather than being out-of-date, non-directivity is more relevant now than ever, and as the breadth and intelligence of the articles suggests, we might even be seeing a significant shift or re-balancing of person-centred thought - a kind of back to the future where the contemporary proliferation and dilution of ideas and practices inspires some to seek out once more the essence of the approach - I don't think it's overstating things to identify this as a key text for anyone wanting to understand what Carl Rogers' approach to therapy has become, some 50 years after its inception. Andy Rogers, Ipnosis No 21, 2006. This book is essential reading for counsellors interested in updating their understanding of Carl Rogers' person-centred theory. In a series of essays written by an impressive international collection of person-centred writers, this book explores important facets of non-directivity as it relates to person-centred theory and practice. Their contributions examine the history, theory, applications and implications of the non-directive attitude. Non-directivity emerges in these pages as a way of being that remains vital and highly relevant to the practice of person-centred therapy, other person-centred applications and psychotherapy in general. Rhonda Luttrell, Diploma in Professional Counselling, QMACA, Counselling Australia, Volume 5, Number 4, Summer 2005