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Handbook of Research on Complexity

Genres: Macroeconomics
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd, Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Published: 1st May 2009
Dimensions: w 234mm h 156mm d 20mm
Weight: 808g
ISBN-10: 1845420896
ISBN-13: 9781845420895
Barcode No: 9781845420895
Synopsis
Complexity research draws on complexity in various disciplines. This Handbook provides a comprehensive and current overview of applications of complexity theory in economics. The 15 chapters, written by leading figures in the field, cover such broad topic areas as conceptual issues, microeconomic market dynamics, aggregation and macroeconomics issues, econophysics and financial markets, international economic dynamics, evolutionary and ecological-environmental economics, and broader historical perspectives on economic complexity. This Handbook presents perspectives at a broad and high level of current cutting edge research in complexity, and will be of great interest to academics concerned with all aspects of economics and in particular economic theory, macroeconomics and evolutionary economics.

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'This volume is a solid introduction to the topics of economic complexity for both the general economist and provides new results that will interest the economists already well versed in the field of economic complexity.' -- Troy Tassier, Eastern Economic Journal 'Complexity theory, complexity science, a general theory of complex systems: these subjects are the height of fashion and for good reason and so a book with this title is very welcome... a valuable book, particularly because the chapter-by-chapter bibliographies are a major resource... the strength of the book lies in its historical reviews and the bibliographies that support them... it will be an important reference book and will contribute to the larger complexity project yet to be undertaken.' -- Alan Wilson, Environment and Planning B