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The "Ladies Magazine", 1749-1753

An Annotated Catalogue of the Literary Prose. Studies in British & American Magazines v. 20

Format: Hardback
Publisher: The Edwin Mellen Press Ltd, New York, United States
Imprint: Edwin Mellen Press Ltd
Published: 31st Oct 2002
Dimensions: h 238mm
ISBN-10: 0773469796
ISBN-13: 9780773469792
Barcode No: 9780773469792
Synopsis
The magazine specialized in moral essays, stories, histories, biographies, and remarkable events of the day, with some attention to natural philosophy and material culture. Yet there is no emphasis on articles aimed at women or conspicuously tailored for "ladies" so the title seems to reach for readers among women with only minimal attention to their interests. Introduction; The Ladies Magazine: or, The Universal Entertainer. By Jasper Goodwill, of Oxford, Esq. is a sixteen-page two-penny periodical that was published everyother Saturday (initially under the control of Robert Walker in the Little Old Bailey), from November 18, 1749, to November 10, 1753. The early title pages announce only that the work was "Printed for the Proprietors, and sold by G. Griffith, at the corner of Elliot's-Court, in the Little Old Bailey, where all letters (post paid) will be received" but Walker's interest in the magazine is evident through the first sixty-eight numbers (to the end of May 1752), and then Thomas Wooddeson became publisher and printer. There is no sure evidence that "Jasper Goodwill" is the mask of an editor-contributor, and because much of the periodical is filled with reprinted material, it might have been assembled by staff working for the publisher. The magazine specialized in moral essays, stories, histories, biographies, and remarkable events of the day, with some attention to natural philosophy and material culture. Yet there is no emphasis on articles aimed at women or conspicuously tailored for "ladies" so the title seems to reach for readers among women with only minimal attention to their interests. As shall become apparent, the "editor" frequently disguised reprinted articles as originals; for example, there are no acknowledgments for publishing papers by Thomas Gordon (5), or Addison and Steele (15). Not only do the annotations here cast some light on editorial practices, they also provide a record of the specific sources used to fill up the four volumes. We know that of the essay serials of the fifties, Samuel Johnson's Rambler (14 reprintings) and Smart's Midwife (also 14) were the most frequently used in the Ladies, but several of the

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