Your price
RRP: £179.00
Save £51.26 (29%)
Dispatched within 2-3 working days.

The Political Economy of Environmental Regulation

The International Library of Critical Writings in Economics Series

Format: Hardback
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd, Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Published: 27th Oct 2004
Dimensions: w 169mm h 244mm d 20mm
Weight: 1212g
ISBN-10: 1843764474
ISBN-13: 9781843764472
Barcode No: 9781843764472
This new authoritative collection comprises previously published papers on the political economy of environmental regulation: economic analyses of the processes through which political decisions regarding environmental regulation are made, principally in the institutional context found in the United States. Despite this geographic focus, many of the papers contain analytical models that are methodologically of interest and/or have lessons that are relevant in other parts of the world. In the environmental realm, questions of political economy emerge along three fundamental dimensions, which are closely interrelated but conceptually distinct: (1) the degrees of government activity; (2) the form of government activity; and (3) the level of government that has responsibility. The first three parts of the book deal respectively with these three fundamental dimensions of inquiry. The fourth part of the book examines the use of economic analysis in contemporary environmental policy. The Political Economy of Environmental Regulation will be of significant interest to environmental scholars, students and policy makers alike. 22 articles, dating from 1975 to 2003

New & Used

Seller Information Condition Price

What Reviewers Are Saying

Submit your review
Newspapers & Magazines
"'In this stimulating compendium, Stavins has assembled many important papers dealing with both positive and normative themes in environmental regulation. The political economy overlay is more than a convenient organizational device, since environmental regulation is both an economic challenge and a target of political opportunity.' - Kenneth Shepsle, Harvard University, US"