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The Wind in the Willows

By (author) Kenneth Grahame
Illustrated by E. H. Shepard
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Egmont UK Ltd, London, United Kingdom
Imprint: Methuen young books
Published: 1st Jan 1950
Dimensions: w 130mm h 190mm
Weight: 434g
Interest age: 6-12
Reading age: 8-10
ISBN-10: 0416393608
ISBN-13: 9780416393606
Barcode No: 9780416393606
Synopsis
The tales of Ratty, Mole, Badger and Toad. When Mole goes boating with the Water Rat instead of spring-cleaning, he discovers a new world. As well as the river and the Wild Wood, there is Toad's craze for fast travel which leads him and his friends on a whirl of trains, barges, gipsy caravans and motor cars and even into battle.

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Kirkus UK
Mole, Water Rat, Mr Toad et al are the animal characters who provide the anthropomorphic vehicles for this exploration of the idyllic English countryside. Certainly this is for children, but it is a delight for any age. (Kirkus UK)
Kirkus US
Does The Wind in the Willows <\i>need an annotated edition? Suggesting that Grahame's prose, "encrusted with the patina of age and affect," has become an obstacle to full appreciation of the work, Lerer offers the text with running disquisitions in the margins on now-archaic words and phrases, Edwardian social mores and a rich array of literary references from Aesop to Gilbert and Sullivan. Occasionally he goes over the top - making, for instance, frequent references alongside Toad's supposed mental breakdown to passages from Kraft-Ebing's writings on clinical insanity - and, as in his controversial Children's Literature, a Reader's History from Aesop to Harry Potter <\i>(2008), displays a narcissistic streak: "This new edition brings The Wind in the Willows<\i>...into the ambit of contemporary scholarship and criticism on children's literature..." Still, the commentary will make enlightening reading for parents or other adults who think that there's nothing in the story for them - and a closing essay on (among other topics) the links between Ernest Shepard's art for this and for Winnie the Pooh <\i>makes an intriguing lagniappe. (selective resource list) (Literary analysis. Adult/professional) <\i> (Kirkus Reviews)