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Mapping It Out

An Alternative Atlas of Contemporary Cartographies

Edited by Hans Ulrich Obrist
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Thames & Hudson Ltd, London, United Kingdom
Published: 1st Jun 2014
Dimensions: w 268mm h 201mm d 23mm
Weight: 1255g
ISBN-10: 0500239185
ISBN-13: 9780500239186
Barcode No: 9780500239186
Synopsis
Over 130 leading lights from different fields - artists, architects, writers and designers, geographers, mathematicians, computer pioneers, scientists - make sense of exterior and interior worlds through highly personal and imaginative maps and charts. Some have translated scientific data into simplified visual language, while others have condensed vast social, political or natural forms into concise diagrams. Many have reworked existing maps to subvert their original purpose or to present an alternative view of reality. Others play with the map's commitment to truth by plotting invented worlds and charting imaginative flights of fancy. Going further, some offer entirely new kinds of map - or even reject the map's claim to bear facts altogether. In the introduction, acclaimed novelist Tom McCarthy reflects on the relationship between maps, literature and knowledge, while Hans Ulrich Obrist closes the book by considering the territory of maps from the perspective of the arts and philosophy.

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'Brings artistry and imagination back to mapmaking ... visually arresting' - FastCompany.com 'Thought-provoking abstractions from artists, designers, scientists and more ... with a beautiful design by Jonathan Barnbrook, it will be a long, long while before this book starts to feel old' - Coolhunting.com 'Fascinating ... explores the post-modern world of alternative cartography' - Geographical 'Engrossing and beautiful' - It's Nice That 'A dizzying catalogue of images that interrogate the role of maps in the 21st century' - New Statesman