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Breaking Rocks

Music, Ideology and Economic Collapse, from Paris to Kinshasa. Dislocations 19

By (author) Joe Trapido
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Berghahn Books, Oxford, United Kingdom
Published: 19th Jan 2017
Dimensions: w 152mm h 238mm d 22mm
Weight: 565g
ISBN-10: 1785333984
ISBN-13: 9781785333989
Barcode No: 9781785333989
Synopsis
Based on fieldwork in Kinshasa and Paris, Breaking Rocks examines patronage payments within Congolese popular music, where a love song dedication can cost 6,000 dollars and a simple name check can trade for 500 or 600 dollars. Tracing this system of prestige through networks of musicians and patrons - who include gangsters based in Europe, kleptocratic politicians in Congo, and lawless diamond dealers in northern Angola - this book offers insights into ideologies of power and value in central Africa's troubled post-colonial political economy, as well as a glimpse into the economic flows that make up the hidden side of the globalization.

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"Built upon a stunningly rich ethnography, Breaking Rocks elaborates on the political entanglement of the music industry spanning across the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Congolese diaspora. A witty, fresh account, including stories and case studies rooted in a thorough period of fieldwork, Breaking Rocks is simply a must-read for anyone either professionally or amateurishly inclined to anthropology or musicology." * Kristien Geenen, Ghent University "This is a highly impressive, utterly original, often brilliant book on both the empirical and theoretical levels... A wonderful ethnography of music production, performance, spectacle, and deceit." * Nancy Rose Hunt, University of Michigan "This is an excellent book, written with great warmth and verve in the narrative... Breaking Rocks will make a significant impact on African Studies." * Michael Rowlands, University College London